Sunday, 21 May 2017

10. The purpose of this knowledge of God


When Calvin sees the “pious laden with afflictions” and how the “wicked flourish” he believes that these point to God’s judgment on all future sin.  He seems to believe that these situations arise because “God’s powers are represented as a painting”.  Do you look at the minutiae of creation rather than seeking the purpose of the whole?  Scholars have viewed the account in Genesis as a whole with its chiastic structure and symmetry yet so readily critics malign the account thinking that it is a manual of how creation took place.  So it seems that Calvin is encouraging us to look at the whole created order and then to recall the ways in which we see God working in our lives.  He cites David in Psalm 92:5-6 in saying that unbelievers often do not see “the designs of God in the governance of mankind” nor in the work of creation.  How easy or difficult do you find it to see God at work in human institutions?

Saturday, 15 April 2017

9. We ought not to rack our brains about God: but rather we should contemplate him in His works


According to Calvin “no long or toilsome proof”  is needed to show God at work.  This is because God’s work can “be easily observed with the eyes and pointed out with the finger”.  Cast your eyes around your surroundings, how hard do you have to look to see signs of God’s work?  Knowledge of God for Calvin will be “sound and fruitful” if it “takes root in the heart”. What knowledge of God has become deeply embedded in your heat?

Calvin cites Paul speaking in the centre of the Areopagus as emphasising that God is not far from each one of us (Acts 17:27-28) and he mentions David declaring God’s greatness (Psalm 145:5-6).  Using teaching from Augustine on the Psalms Calvin stresses that human beings “cannot grasp” God.  How caught up are we in a world that grasps for knowledge, for money and for meaning?  How can we replace such grasping with “sound and fruitful” knowledge of God?

Saturday, 18 March 2017

8.God’s sovereign sway over the life of men


Calvin believes that Psalm 107 illustrates the heavenly providence of God thus giving the godly the opportunity to rejoice. But he also believes that most people “get immersed in their own errors” and are therefore blind to God’s providence.  Do you know people today who are blind in the face of the goodness of God?  What are the twenty fist century causes of such blindness?  Calvin has a sense that God shows his power over the impious “their arrogance vanquished” at a time of “best opportunity” thus “confounding the wisdom of the world”.  So “he catches the crafty in their own craftiness (1 Corinthians 3:19, Job 5:13). Have you ever seen God catch the crafty and thus reveal His glory?

Saturday, 18 February 2017

7. God’s government and judgment



Would you consider that God “tempers his providence”?

Is this an unduly controlling aspect of god’s character? Calvin believes that god declares his clemency to the godly and his severity to the wicked”  Do you see evidence of this in our world today? Or are human beings so far from God that it is impossible to determine?  Calvin begins to address the notion that bad things happen to good people and that sometimes the wicked seem to prosper.  But Calvin’s view of God is one of infinite kindness: God “pursues miserable sinners with unwearied kindness”. Can you see God doing this in our world today? Who in your opinion is the most miserable sinner that God needs to pursue? Could it be you?



Saturday, 21 January 2017

6. The Creator reveals His Lordship over the creation


Calvin insists that “nothing is more preposterous than to enjoy the very remarkable gifts that attest the divine nature within us yet overlook the author”. He describes certain natural events as taking place at God’s “pleasure”.  How do we view this with our technology to predict weather and earthquakes and much more?  He finds instances of the testimony of nature in the books of Job and Isaiah.  He notices that seeing God at work in nature can be common to those familiar with God’s ways and those who are “strangers”.  All this Calvin suggests should direct us towards God’s love as there is no creature “upon whom God’s mercy has not been poured out” (Psalm 145:9, Ecclesiasticus 18:11).

How frequently do you look at some creature and imagine God’s mercy being poured out upon it? Could it be true for a rat in the sewer or for a house fly?